This month we had the chance to go on holiday for two weeks which I made the most of with catching up on some reading. Here’s a round-up.

Prisoners of geography by Tim Marshall

This was the book I most enjoyed reading. The premise of the book is that geography effects how our world works on a global political scale more than most of us realise. Each chapter is given to a different country and area to explore the impact of the geography of the area. Written after the annexation of Crimea but ahead of our current war in Eastern Europe between Russia and Ukraine, one of the insights that was most helpful is understanding the geography between these two countries which led to the historical tension and current conflict. Other areas covered include the relationship between Pakistan and India, as well as China, and the Middle East.

Read this book if you want to be informed further on the current war in Eastern Europe, as well as expand your knowledge of how global politics work even in our era of technology and globalisation.

Scottish myths compiled by Jake Jackson

I love reading Greek mythology and the fantasy worlds of Lord of the Rings. While I’ve picked up a couple of stories about kelpies and faeries over time growing up in Scotland, this was the first real reading of some of these stories. The “old” language was a little tricky to get my head round at some points but the short stories of the myths held my attention. Read this book if you want to explore Scottish myths (obviously)

How to kill your family by Bella Mackie

You’ll be happy to know that this is a work of fiction. After recently reading her non-fiction ‘Jog on’, it was great to read another book by her. It took me the first couple of chapters to get used to the pacing but was worth sticking with. Read this book if you’re looking for your next fiction page-turner.

Live no lies by John Mark Comer

John Mark Comer’s latest entry took me by surprise, I’d assumed that it was simply about identifying lies that we tell ourselves. However, it was this and yet so much more. John Mark write simply yet profoundly asking honest questions about what freedom is from both a faith and a cultural perspective enabling us to think critically about what truth is.

“You become what you give your mind to.” P87

Apape love definition: “A compassionate commitment to delight in the soul of another, and to will that person’s good ahead of your own, no matter the cost to yourself.” P130

“It’s true it will cost us to follow Jesus, but it will cost us even more to not follow him.” P252

Read this book if you’re seeking to learn how to navigate the culture we live in and grow in confidence in your faith in Jesus.

Elon Musk by Ashlee Vance

Elon Musk is a name that I have heard of many times but this biography helped explain a little bit more about why he makes the headlines (for the good and bad reasons). The vision, focus, and work ethic that Elon has is incredibly inspiring. The fallout of relationships and work culture created by some of the previous makes me wonder whether it’s worth it. Note: it does only take you up to 2015. Read this book if you’re trying to understand the world of Elon Musk and Silicon Valley.

What have you been reading? Let me know in the comments, Dan

Book list

Prisoners of geography by Tim Marshall

How to kill your family by Bella Mackie

Scottish myths compiled by Jake Jackson

Live no lies by John Mark Comer

Elon Musk by Ashlee Vance